Internet memes & concept checking, by Marcelo de Cristo

Internet memes are all around us these days. Whether you like them or not, you are bombarded with them 24/7 through social media. And so are your learners – kids, teens and adults who sometimes find learning about grammar difficult… or just dead boring! So how can you take advantage of internet memes to help your learners understand grammar? In other words, how can you use internet memes for checking key grammar concepts? Read on and find out. Continue reading Internet memes & concept checking, by Marcelo de Cristo

Subject / verb agreement mistakes: 7 things to bear in mind.

First things first: What is subject / verb agreement?

It’s a grammatical rule that states that the verb must agree in number with its subject. In English, present tense verbs change to show agreement in the third person singular form by adding an S (or ES). Seems fairly straightforward, doesn’t it? So how could it be that students of all levels, nationalities and age groups seem to get this wrong far more often than would seem reasonable? Continue reading Subject / verb agreement mistakes: 7 things to bear in mind.

teaching inversion – guest post by Ricardo Barros

It has long bothered me that the use of inversions in speaking is largely seen as unnatural. Time and time again I would go to a training session or overhear other teachers speaking and inversions would come up in a mocking tone, as if using this particular structure in speaking is hilarious in itself. In my experience, inversions (and to be more specific, inversions after negative adverbials) are commonly presented in advanced course books (CEFR C1) as a formal structure that should only be used in writing. Continue reading teaching inversion – guest post by Ricardo Barros

4 questions to help you plan your next grammar lesson

A lot of what we do in class tends to be related to grammar in one way or another. This post, which won the British Council Blog of the Month Award in Feb 2013, examines some of the questions that we should ask ourselves before planning a grammar lesson.

Continue reading 4 questions to help you plan your next grammar lesson